Episode 8 – Writing the Climate Crisis – The Wreck of Time and Environmental Poetry

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World Is Burning, book club edition. We talk about reading to ease climate anxiety, how art helps us process complicated emotions, and coming back to your favorite work over the years. 

We read from The Wreck of Time by Annie Dillard as well as poetry by Wumen Huikai, Nnimmo Bassey, Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner, and Mikko Harvey.

But first, we discussed climate anxiety as defined by the American Psychological Association as “a chronic fear of environmental doom.”

We also talked about the growing number of artists using their creative skills to talk about the climate crisis, including Creative Action Network’s Green New Deal Poster Book that benefits the Sunrise Movement.

Story #1: The Wreck of Time by Annie Dillard (Elise)
Annie Dillard for The New York Times

Sources:

The Wreck of Time by Annie Dillard (PDF of essay / buy For The Time Being)

Brain Pickings, Annie Dillard on Choosing Presence Over Productivity
Wikipedia on the 1991 Cyclone in Bangladesh

Olivia mentioned the “calm” website, which is Pixel Thoughts’ 60-Second Meditation Tool.

Story #2: Environmental Poetry (Olivia)
A bookmark Olivia found on a trip to Brooklyn, August 2018

Poems:
Wumen Huikai, Translation 1, Translation 2
Nnimmo Bassey, I Will Not Dance to Your Beat and When the Earth Bleeds
Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner, Dear Matafele Peinam (poem and UN Climate Summit video)
Mikko Harvey, The Poem Grace Interrupted

Other climate poetry collections to check out:
Poets.org, Poems About Climate Change
The Guardian, Keep It In the Ground: A Poem a Day
The Poetry Foundation, Poetry and the Environment (especially ‘Anthracite Country’ by Jay Parini)
Chicago Review of Books, 10 Poems About Climate Change to Read Right Now
The RSA, 9 Original Poems on Climate Change 

Other sources:
Lapham’s Quarterly, Wumen Huikai
CMS Impact, Fair Use in Poetry

We briefly mentioned the activist Vanessa Nakate and her posters that read “We cannot eat coal, we cannot drink oil.

via Vanessa Nakate’s Twitter, @Vanessa_Vash, September 2020
The Dump

We are so obsessed with Jon Bois and SB Nation’s 17776 that we are recommending the sequel, 20020, before we’ve even read it.

Elise has been enjoyed the podcast Clothes Horse about demystifying the fashion industry. They have an episode on vegan leather that is a good companion to our last episode!

Our World is Burning themed playlist is on Spotify.

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Thanks for listening!

Ep. 30 – No Facts, No Information, Just Vibes: Cotton and Microfiber World Is Burning

This week, we're taking a closer look at the natural and synthetic materials you're probably wearing right now. How did cotton become the "fabric of our lives"? Elise explains the reasoning behind advertising a material rather than a brand, and tells us which policies we should be paying attention to in regard to cotton manufacturing. Then Olivia takes on the massive (but nearly invisible) problem of the synthetic material industry: microfibers. 1.4 million trillion of them. Other topics discussed: exciting life changes, the limits of individual action and systems-change advocacy, and TikTok Olivia Rodrigo theories. Subscribe/follow/press the button to keep up with new episodes every Wednesday! You can also follow us @worldisburnin on Instagram and Twitter, and check out our website worldisburning.com for extended show notes including sources and photos. — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/worldisburning/message
  1. Ep. 30 – No Facts, No Information, Just Vibes: Cotton and Microfiber
  2. Down The Rabbit Hole Minisode 3: Treaty People Gathering and Line 3
  3. Ep. 29 – Colonizing the Ocean and Mars?
  4. Ep. 28 – Lawn Culture and Mushroom Scams
  5. Ep. 27 – Why is Chevron So Obsessed With Steven Donziger?